SuperWesele.pl - forum ślubne i weselne

Zaloguj się lub zarejestruj.

Zaloguj się podając nazwę użytkownika, hasło i długość sesji
Szukanie zaawansowane  

Autor Wątek: Can You Trust Digital Health Firms To Trust You?  (Przeczytany 105 razy)

miniming

  • Aktywny użytkownik
  • ***
  • Wiadomości: 104
    • Zobacz profil
Can You Trust Digital Health Firms To Trust You?
« dnia: Luty 25, 2021, 05:52:21 am »

Can You Trust Digital Health Firms To Trust You?



What kind of health care organization would let a 10-year-old child make an instructional video for patients? And what might that decision teach health tech companies trying to gain the trust of consumers?

I found myself pondering those questions while listening to Dr. Peter Margolis, co-chair of a National Academy of Medicine committee on health data sharing and stakeholder trust and a speaker at the recent (virtual) Health Datapalooza annual conference. Margolis is also co-director of the Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence at Cincinnati Children’s, the institution that allowed 10-year old kids with a condition necessitating a feeding tube to create videos showing other children how to insert one. Parents, meanwhile, were recruited to help develop new technology to help their child.

The payoff for this and similar efforts by the shared learning communities Cincinnati Children’s has birthed has been significantly improved outcomes and national renown. But for this type of initiative to succeed, Margolis told me when I visited a few years ago, clinicians and administrators “have to be comfortable with a very different kind of role.”

As consumers gain access to information once limited to medical insiders, that advice seems increasingly prescient. Federal rules requiring providers to make electronic health data available to patients at no cost take effect April 5.  Meanwhile, voluntary electronic sharing of physician clinical notes is rapidly morphing from the unthinkable to the unremarkable, while apps to make all this data actionable are proliferating. As a result, long-simmering issues related to transparency and trust and are coming to the fore.

“Change is hard,” cautioned Catherine DesRoches, executive director of the OpenNotes initiative. For doctors uncomfortable with having patients essentially peer over their shoulder, she advises simplicity: “Write in your notes what you talk about [with the patient] and talk about what you write.”

Read More : pgslot
Zapisane